Application Layering

As a community board member of WhatMatrix, I am delighted that category consultant Rory Monaghan has updated his Application layering comparison. To promote this update, I’ve written a blog post that the WhatMatrix team has kindly linked to my blog at the end. So, this very short post is to promote the update and to reciprocate the link back to the WhatMatrix site.

Let me tell you, the category consultants that produce these independent comparisons, in their own time and it’s a LOT of work, are the epitome of community folk. They do what they do to give back to the community. Yes, there’s an element of self-promotion, but truly you should not underestimate the work involved here. Plus, the value that these comparisons provide to organisations making decisions about technology and not having to do this time extensive work themselves is unquestionable.

Please take at a look at WhatMatrix and either use their comparisons for your own benefit or, if you like what you see, promote the site to your peers as I believe we are offering something truly unique and, more importantly, of value. Oh, and I did I say it’s FREE!

Disclaimer: Liquidware, who is included in the Application Layering Comparison, is a client of my company hiviz-marketing.com

Nutanix’s acquisition of Frame

Well, this news lit up my Twitter feed late last night/early this morning. From a technology perspective, I think this is a good move by Nutanix – it will, however, be interesting to see how the Street reacts when it wakes up in a few hours. While the news hit my attention, what grabbed it more was the commentary by a certain exec at VMware.

A few years, after an acquisition that VMware made, an individual that came over in that acquisition started to use Twitter as a platform to convey his rather inflammatory opinion about the competition. I was always surprised that VMware allowed this level of derogatory remarks to other industry players – and indeed people too – but he was just branded a bit of a renegade and maverick. He wasn’t super high up in the food chain and has, subsequently, left but I was always mystified as to how a publicly listed company allowed employees to express such venomous views. He is now a CEO of a small start up and he has certainly ‘toned down’ his tweets!

Certain employees of Nutanix are well known for being bolshy and posting controversial social media messages, but I’ve never witnessed its leader, Dheeraj Pandey being anything other than business like and to the point. Therefore, I was impressed by his composure on Twitter earlier in response to Sanjay Poonen’s tweets…… Why do executives of publicly listed companies lower themselves to ‘tit for tatting’ spat tweets? Why? It’s just not necessary, it’s not professional and it’s not acceptable in my view.

I always advise to take the high ground, don’t stoop to others’ levels of unprofessionalism – don’t be a keyboard warrior, if you wouldn’t say it to their face, don’t put it out on social media. This really is social media 101 and to those that infringe it, you make me cringe every time I read your tweets, so please, please grow up and stop throwing stones in the playground!

 

 

Does a Broader Church Impact the Congregation?

I had an interesting conversation with a long time VMUG member at yesterday’s London VMUG meeting. He’d not been to a meeting in a while and felt that some of the content and sponsors weren’t relevant, at least not to him in his role (specifically vSphere focused). In talking to one of the sponsors, BlueMedora, who operate on top of vRops – which this particular member doesn’t use – he said this highlighted the lack of relevance of a VMUG meeting for him.

I commented that perhaps VMware is becoming less relevant in today’s IT stack and he countered that with so many differing solutions, perhaps folks like him are looking at more niche type events.

However, on further cogitation I don’t believe that VMware is becoming less relevant per se, just that other options are becoming more prevalent. What I do think, however, is that whilst the VMware community is still strong and passionate, VMUG itself is, perhaps, becoming less relevant.

With the recent “VMUG Gate” issues surrounding Nutanix and then the communications debacle around the announcement of VMUG becoming part of Dell Technologies User Community, perhaps VMUG itself is at risk of demise due to trying to be a broader ‘church’? I recently spoke to one of my colleagues in the Nordic region about a decline in meeting attendance and with numbers on the low side in London too, especially considering Frank Denneman was on the agenda, maybe VMUG itself needs to adapt and morph to remain relevant?

Perhaps there needs to be different tracks for different interests; one for traditional ol’ vSphere-ites and one for the fanbois of all things new and shiny, and not necessarily just VMware?

Would love to hear other folks’ view on this post and hopefully it won’t blacklist me from a potential 2018 vExpert inclusion 😉

In closing, this tweet from last night’s Luxury vBeers reminded me that whilst there are corporate politics and bureaucracy, the community will always win through!

 

 

 

London VMUG 6th April

vmw_vmug_logoI’m particularly looking forward to next week’s London VMUG meeting; not just because I’ll catch up with all the usual members, not just because there’s another great agenda put together by the volunteer leaders, but also because I’ll be there with my new client, Runecast, who is a silver sponsor.

They’ve just returned from an awesome 2 UserCons down in Australia. Runecast Analyzer received a great reception ‘down under’ and my twitter stream was alight at silly o’clock in the mornings due to copious amounts of tweets! Runecast is also sponsoring the German and UK UserCons in June and November, as well Silicon Valley and Indianapolis in the US.

For those readers unaware or unfamiliar with Runecast Analyzer, it is a proactive VMware vSphere management solution that installs as an OVA format virtual appliance. Runecast Analyzer uses current VMware Knowledge Base articles and Runecast’s expertise to analyze the virtual infrastructure and expose potential issues and best practice violations, before they cause major outages.

I’ve been extremely excited by the reception that both the team and their solution has been receiving recently. From talking with potential partners, interviewing customers for case studies and reading blogs by many leading industry luminaries, such as Duncan Epping, Cormac Hogan and Vladan Seget, it is clear that Runecast Analyzer is a ‘must have’ in any VMware vSphere environment, plus if you’re a vExpert, you get an NFR for free!

Check out the agenda below to see timings for the day, and hope to see you in London next week!

lonvmugagenda

 

 

Robot Wars, Internet Community and Going Autonomic!

Having always been a Robot Wars fan, I’ve been riveted to my TV on a Sunday evening now that it’s finally back on our screens after a 12 year hiatus. What makes it even more compelling viewing is the fact that one of the robots, Storm2, is sponsored by VMware and one of the team is from VMware, Ed Hoppitt. Unfortunately, they were defeated last Sunday, but the show was great viewing and spotted a few fleeting shots of Joe Baguley! Ed was wearing a Cloud Native Apps t-shirt in one of his interviews, so a good bit of branding! What was also interesting to me was the interview with one of the judges, Dr Lucy Rogers, when she spoke of the camaraderie between the teams and how the Internet has created a great community. Dr Lucy recommended, “Get involved, get online.” She also mentioned the Internet allows discussions to take place anywhere in the world. Which reminded me of the great community that I am part of – we’re all here for each other when needed, even if we work for competing vendors (caveat: as with most generalisations, they’re generally true, but there are some exceptions to this rule, as observed at times on Twitter 🙂 ). You can view episode 4 of Robot Wars here on BBC iPlayer.

Speaking of competing vendors, I found the news this week that VMTurbo has changed its name to Turbonomic fascinating. I worked with them a few years ago (2012-2013) to assist in raising awareness and creating demand in the UK. Although I’ve not personally used their product, I’ve seen it in action and spoken to many customers that rely on it on a daily basis. Plus, I believe their patented economic scheduling engine to be very innovative. I’ve always seen it more as a complement to VMware, but many view it as a competitor to vROps. There are overlaps, of course. However, in my opinion, the main area of competition is not specifically technology, but more budget. If $$ are limited, organisations are not necessarily going to purchase both solutions.

I think a name change has been on the cards for a while but hats off to the marketing team in executing a pretty smooth transition to the new name and the new messaging. My only critique is the new logo, but only from a nit-picky and possibly subjective perspective. When you have a list of sponsors of an event listed – with the same sized real-estate for each logo – the smaller the width of the name, the more prominent a logo looks. Given the length of the new logo, Turbonomic will not be as visible in the first instance. As this example from the Gold sponsorship list from VMworld demonstrates, but guess you could argue the green “on” is pretty prominent!

Screen Shot 2016-08-19 at 09.40.15

 

Since Eric Wright joined VMTurbo, oops, Turbonomic, I’ve witnessed their commitment to the community develop considerably. They also have an online community forum, Green Circle.

Turbonomic has gone from being intelligent workload management, to a software-defined control platform, to now being an Autonomic Platform. I wish them continued success under the new brand!